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STÄBETANZ, INIZIO STUDIO

January 26, 2017

Gennaio e Febbraio sono in studio a preparare un breve assolo con il costume di Sonia Biacchi tratto dai Balletti Triadici di Oskar Schlemmer: StäbeTanz.
 

SCHEDA PROGETTO (ENG)

STÄBETANZ PROJECTAN INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE INTO THE MECHANICAL BEING, FROM BAUHAUS TO THE PRESENT, THE REVISITATION OF STÄBETANZ.

 

The dance explore and shows the potential of technologies that could overcome fundamental human limitations. Entering the Noosphere: a "sphere of human thought" returned to the audience through lines and sounds.Is it all this possible without human sensibility?

HISTORICAL REFERENCES

StäbeTanz has been conceived in 1927 by German artist Oskar Schlemmer (1888–1943) part of Schlemmer's famous Das Triadisches Ballett.The subject which he loved to explore was the proportional perfection of a human body and the things humans are capable of doing with it. His theater workshop at Bauhaus was one of the places where abstraction in dance had been explored for the first time.Oskar Schlemmer's love for geometry, mathematics, abstraction and purity of form can be seen so clearly in his Stäbetanz (Stick Dance). In a motionless position, lines-sticks, as the extensions of a human body, resemble the abstract painting. And as the dance starts and lines start moving, the painting itself starts to dance.Just as 18th and 19th-century ‘progress’ compelled people to conform movements to the rhythm of the factory, Schlemmer’s constricting additions forced their wearers to empathize with their own mechanics.

INTENTIONS

Starting from the historical references my intentions for this project are:recover the original movement from Schlemmer’s StäbeTanzenlighten the geometries with visual projections through video mapping example: Ballet Rotoscope — https://vimeo.com/user49400726 create a soundscape while moving using AUMI Software:(Adaptive Use Musical Instruments –AUMI- software interface is a new musical instrument that enables people who have very limited controlled (voluntary) movement to independently engage in music making. Developed by musician, composer, and humanitarian Pauline Oliveros, the Adaptive Use Musical Instruments (AUMI) project brings together the expertise of technicians at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and the community education initiatives of the Deep Listening Institute.

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